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On the Gateway: Looking to Summer

As the world slowly moves toward normalcy, policies and guidance continue to change.
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The Alumni Education Gateway provides information about what to expect as life starts to return to pre-pandemic norms and everyone works to enjoy the 2021 summer season to the fullest.

CLARIFYING MASK GUIDANCE

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently announced that fully vaccinated people are allowed to go without a mask indoors and outdoors. However, the new national and state guidance does not apply to all places or people. Here are 11 things you should know.

Q&A: VACCINES FOR KIDS

Michigan Medicine experts Pamela Rockwell and Sharon Kileny answer parents’ top questions about vaccinations for younger teens (ages 12 to 15) in a special panel discussion. Specific topics include clinical trials. efficacy in kids, possible side effects, and vaccine misconceptions.

SUMMER CAMPS AND IMMUNIZATIONS

Most children need to show immunization records to attend school. A new study conducted by Michigan Medicine found that the same may not be true for camps. This can be problematic, as campers are in close contact and share common spaces.

UNDERSTANDING HERD IMMUNITY AND HESITANCY

Abram Wagner, a research assistant professor of epidemiology in the U-M School of Public Health, explains why reaching herd immunity might not be as simple as we thought and what vaccine hesitancy and availability have to do with it.

PARENTS’ PANDEMIC CONCERNS

The pandemic forcibly changed children’s routines and psyches, which could have a lasting impact. A C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health at Michigan Medicine found that, among many issues, parents are most concerned about their kids’ overuse of social media and screen time, internet safety, unhealthy eating, depression, and a lack of physical activity.

FRUITFUL SLEEP

Whether dealing with a pandemic or the everyday grind, a good night’s sleep is invaluable. A new U-M study has found that increasing the consumption of fruits and vegetables could help young adults sleep better, especially young women.

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