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On the Gateway INSIGHTS ON THE ENVIRONMENT

The Alumni Education Gateway shares U-M insights, research, and thoughts on addressing environmental issues.
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As November’s national election approaches, environmental and sustainability issues will become even bigger focal points for discussion and policy. U-M faculty are foremost in examining how the nation should approach emerging and existent threats to our planet’s well-being. The Alumni Education Gateway is your access point for this topic and more from the U-M community of schools, colleges, and units.

PANDEMIC’S EFFECT ON RECYCLING

Materials science and engineering professor Brian J. Love and Julie Rieland, a doctoral candidate in macromolecular science and engineering, write about how the COVID-19 pandemic has caused devastating disruptions for the U.S. recycling industry.

THE PRESIDENCY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Ford School of Public Policy professor Barry Rabe argues that U.S. environmental policy has been shaped by short-term executive order and administrative powers for too long, forgoing potentially enduring legislation.

OVERPROJECTING THE CHANGE

Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences researchers Chris Poulsen, Jiang Zhu, and Bette Otto-Bliesner find that some of the latest-generation climate models may be overly sensitive to carbon dioxide increases.

GENERATIONAL DRIVING DIFFERENCES

Professor Tom Lyons, of Michigan Ross and the School of Environment and Sustainability, and experts from other institutions discuss research that shows millennial attitudes toward transportation and the environment contribute to a lower rate of driving when compared with previous generations.

ALGAE ON LAKE ERIE

Researchers are forecasting that western Lake Erie will experience a moderate harmful algal bloom in a study released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which funds this research. Lake Erie blooms consist of cyanobacteria, also called blue-green algae, which pose a risk to human and wildlife health.

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