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As U-M was getting ready to celebrate a major milestone in its existence in 1912, the school discovered a surprising fact: the famous Maize and Blue had not been officially defined.
While starring in her own television series has elevated Michelle Oakley’s profile, life as a veterinarian remains her foremost priority.
In this series, John Wang, '03, shares his culinary insights.
We can never pick when the world shifts, so seeking growth on purpose prepares us for being comfortable with these forced adaptations.
What alumnus was president and general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers when he signed Jackie Robinson, thus breaking the color barrier in Major League Baseball?
U-M alumni share their travel photos.
The United States’ and Japan’s passion for baseball proved to be a tool for cultural exchange in the 1920s and 30s, and U-M’s prowess on the field contributed to it.
Who was the first Asian student to attend U-M? See the answer below.
Michigan Alum asked an award-winning librarian and alumna to suggest books that her fellow alumni may enjoy reading this summer.
Alyah Chanelle Scott is back in college, this time starring as a student in the HBO Max series “Sex Lives of College Girls.”
U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson delivered U-M’s most famous commencement speech in 1964. Learn the story of what led to that event.
From the late 1980s to the early 2000s, one April tradition gave U-M administrators a headache and student participants an unorthodox freedom: the Naked Mile.
Which alumna won the 2019 Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Play? See the answer below.
In this series, John Wang, '03, shares his culinary insights.
U-M alumni share their travel photos.
In 1991, what acclaimed physicist had an annual U-M lecture series named in his honor and endowed by gifts from the U-M Alumni Association in Taiwan? See answer below.
"I had seen probably 10 college campuses, and never had I felt as at home as I did when walking along State Street or checking email in Angell Hall."
Red might be the traditional color of Valentine’s Day, but for many U-M alumni, true love’s hue is Maize and Blue.