Nonlethal Parasites Reduce How Much Their Wild Hosts Eat

May 11, 2022

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5-15 mins
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Yosemite Valley Landscape And River, California
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Presented by Michigan News

U-M Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology professor, Biological Station director, and co-author of the study Aimée Classen discusses the research looking at the consequences of common parasitic infections in wild animals on terrestrial ecosystems. Classen notes that pervasive parasitic infections “reduce herbivory rates and can therefore trigger trophic cascades that impact plant communities,” using a mathematical model and a global meta-analysis to analyze theses consequences. The faculty expert further highlights findings from the study and the impact the “unseen things” have on a larger scale.

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